pallet-blob

Algemeen

Architectuur

Back in 2005, Matthias Loebermann built a beautiful temporary pavilion out of reclaimed shipping pallets for the Nordic Alpine Skiing World Championship in Oberstdorf, Germany. Shipping pallets are found all over the world and make for a sturdy low-cost building material, which accounts for the remarkable rise of “Palletecture” projects as of late. Loebermann designed and built this pavilion out of 1300 shipping pallets and held them together using tie rods and pull straps. At night the interior was lit with a lamp and glare reflectors that brilliantly shone out through the gaps of the pallets.

Architecture students from the University of Biberach assisted with the construction of the pavilion, which measure 6 meters high, 8 meters wide and 18 meters long. The shipping pallets are stacked on top of each other in a curvilinear design, fastened together with tie rods and pulled tight with compression straps. An irregular geometric form is created with an interior cave-like room that welcomes visitors.

The temporary pavilion was used as a meeting place and media room for athletes and press to come to after their competitions. At the time of the skiing competitions, it was obviously winter and the structure was often covered in snow. As the pavilion was constructed of only tie rods, straps and pallets, dismantling and recycling the structure was quite simple after the competition was over. Loeberman used pallets to encourage people to look at the common item in a new light as a building material — back in 2005, this concept was still relatively new for most people.

+ Matthias Loebermann

Via Inhabitat.com via BLDGBLOG

Photo credits ©Mila Hacke

comments from the original post

18 COMMENTS:

archialternative.com said…

In one word: beautiful… (Inspiring too.)

AUGUST 22, 2010 1:30 PM

James said…

I’m sure it occurs elsewhere but in Northern Ireland, every 12th of July, there are huge bonfires built all over the country out of these pallets (and to a lesser extent various other wooden/flammable debris). Despite the inevitable burning of all these structures they are carefully built to ensure they are relatively safe (many are built along busy roads in Belfast) and as tall as possible. I have never really cosidered an architectural aspect to these until now. It would be interesting to hear your opinion Geoff! I would send a link to youtube only I can’t find any without heavily sectarian overtones.

AUGUST 22, 2010 2:18 PM

GlenH said…

It works wonderfully as a sculptural object, but fails abjectly as even a “temporary” building. A gazebo would do a better job at keeping the weather out- why pretend it has practical qualities when it is a beautiful (and inexpensive!) avant garde garden folly?

AUGUST 22, 2010 3:45 PM

archialternative.com said…

Oh! Here you go! Beautiful… That’s the keyword.

“Whether you come from heaven or hell, what does it matter, O Beauty!”

Charles Baudelaire

AUGUST 22, 2010 9:03 PM

pete v said…

Very cool, looks like corrugated cardboard

AUGUST 23, 2010 8:22 AM

Edlyn said…

Love the texture in this piece.

Reminds me of a project that a tutor once issued;

a house as a light.

light as a house.

brilliant.

AUGUST 23, 2010 11:14 AM

John Sager said…

This is a great way to get sick and/or cancer!

Wood pallets carry serious pathogens and chemicals.

http://www.pallettruth.com/2010/07/would-you-let-your-child-sleep-on-a-wooden-pallet/

AUGUST 23, 2010 11:32 AM

pete v said…

Hmmm, www.pallettruth.com is copyrighted by another website dedicated to driving the sale of plastic products.

AUGUST 23, 2010 1:28 PM

August said…

As anyone who’s worked in a shipping dock will tell you, wooden pallets are also rarely so uniform in quality, appearance, stability, etc. It’s not unusual for even a modest stack of the things to be horribly unstable, and even flat-out dangerous. They also don’t last very long ‘in the field’, as it were; most of their value lies in how cheap and disposable they are. They don’t hold up well. You’d be hard-pressed to find that many pallets that were ready for re-use. Any pallet in good enough shape to build with isn’t ready to be discarded yet.

You couldn’t pay me to walk through that ‘building’.

AUGUST 23, 2010 2:38 PM

Grkw said…

James and Geoff,

David Schalliol has some chilling photos of the Belfast pallet pyres from this past July 12th here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/metroblossom/4781631892/in/set-72157624467003926/

AUGUST 23, 2010 2:54 PM

Geoff Manaugh said…

Grkw, here is a particularly good photo from Schalliol’s series.

AUGUST 23, 2010 8:26 PM

Renee van Staveren said…

Absolutely love all architecture that involves the use of recycled materials, even for the sake of art – of which this is a beautiful piece.

These temporary dwellings are reminiscent of the caves in Cappadocia, Turkey. I loved how a simple palette, and the lighting that dances from its openings, can bring me back to such a beautiful place in an instant.

AUGUST 25, 2010 10:44 AM

twic said…

I find it rather sad that a building which is beautiful but completely useless merits a post and six photographs, but that a structure which is actually useful is “not […] interesting” and unmoving. What is a building for if it is not for something? What is architecture for if it is not for something?

And i’m sure you know your semiotics from your semipermanents and your post-structuralism from your structural posts very well, but perhaps i could point out that those vertical things at the edges of the building which keep the weather and the noise out aren’t “references to walls”, they’re walls!

AUGUST 25, 2010 2:23 PM

Andrew said…

Gorgeous, totally gorgeous. Kudos to Mila Hacke for capturing the project very nicely.

AUGUST 25, 2010 3:31 PM

Amy said…

I’m with you on that one in Southwark, it’s rubbish.

AUGUST 25, 2010 3:33 PM

Viktor said…

How to transform a humble object into art.

Someone commented that architecture is for something… in this case obviously the purpose is to express and inspire beauty. I cannot think of a higher purpose than that…

AUGUST 26, 2010 3:19 AM

mikedbennett said…

Finally a pallet house that isn’t a dilapidated box!

AUGUST 26, 2010 6:50 AM

Toemailer said…

Fascinating!

AUGUST 26, 2010 5:36 PM

Architecture students from the University of Biberach assisted with the construction of the pavilion, which measure 6 meters high, 8 meters wide and 18 meters long. The shipping pallets are stacked on top of each other in a curvilinear design, fastened together with tie rods and pulled tight with compression straps. An irregular geometric form is created with an interior cave-like room that welcomes visitors.

The temporary pavilion was used as a meeting place and media room for athletes and press to come to after their competitions. At the time of the skiing competitions, it was obviously winter and the structure was often covered in snow. As the pavilion was constructed of only tie rods, straps and pallets, dismantling and recycling the structure was quite simple after the competition was over. Loeberman used pallets to encourage people to look at the common item in a new light as a building material — back in 2005, this concept was still relatively new for most people.

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